Primarily Primates Newsletter — Summer 2008

Primarily Primates Newsletter — Summer 2008

Three Gibbons Return to Primarily Primates!

Our dear Kimchi

Our dear Kimchi (meaning “Little Cabbage”) is a hybrid of golden-cheeked gibbon and a subspecies of Chinese white-cheeked gibbon. This photo was taken by Dr. Valerie Kirk on April 18, 2008.

See Video Twelve gibbons (primates who are not monkeys, but small apes, and whose bodies look very much like our own) have also been in limbo during the case of Chimps, Inc. vs. Primarily Primates. We felt unable to settle the case until we could ensure the one gibbon who was left alone at our refuge got a group of friends back. It did not seem right to let Kimchi, the one lone gibbon, sing alone. Their distinctive singing is an important way for gibbons to interact. As a solo, the song of a gibbon is a very lonely sound. So we are very happy to let you know that Kimchi is being joined by José Maria, Junior, and Scoshio. As we write, plans are in place and preparations are being made for three gibbons to be returned from South Carolina on the 2nd of June. This is proceeding under veterinary care, with our director, Stephen Tello, accompanying the three home in an air-conditioned vehicle.

Kimchi came to us from a zoo in January 2002. At that time, Scoshio, a white-handed gibbon, had been living at Primarily Primates for eight years, and Junior had already been living at our refuge for six years. Junior, also a white handed gibbon, was once kept as a pet, and is 22 years old this year. Junior’s father came from Vietnam; his mother was given to the pet-owner by the San Antonio Zoo. José Maria originally came to Primarily Primates in 2002, as part of a group of eight, from the same private home where Junior once lived. As a pet, dark-haired, dashing José Maria had to endure the pain of canine teeth actions. Please join us and Kimchi in welcoming José Maria, Junior, and Scoshio back to Primarily Primates, where newly expanded living spaces await them, and a lot of love and caring is in store for them. Update: The Emma and Jackson Custody Case Closes When two of our youngest chimpanzees, Emma and Jackson, were removed and transported out of state, our struggle over custody became a national media event. But to Primarily Primates, it was simply part of our commitment to looking after these youngsters for life — precisely the commitment that defines us as a sanctuary. Other values to consider are the feelings of Jackson and Emma after they’ve been living in another community over a long period, and the harmony and mutual support that ought to exist among the sanctuary movement as a whole. So in May, we decided that — rather than carry on a protracted legal dispute with Chimps, Inc. which could last years — Jackson and Emma should remain where they are, in Oregon. Supporters need to know how and where particular primates will be permanently settled, but the suit Chimps, Inc. filed in Oregon had kept these two young chimpanzees in legal limbo. We decided it would not be fair to two young chimpanzees to let them go through a substantial part of their adolescence in Oregon and then be uprooted. We also believe that reaching a settlement agreement would allow us to move ahead and attempt to foster harmony in the sanctuary community. We want Emma and Jackson to have a happy life. We’ll always miss them. But we do have confidence that Jackson and Emma will enjoy a place of permanent safety. Joining Primarily Primates With Friends of Animals, Priscilla Feral Throws Watermelon Party for the Chimpanzees

Hope and Grace finish their watermelon.

Hope and Grace finish their watermelon.

With hoots and expressions of delight, Champ, Tina, Buffy, April, Uriah and Carmen, who’s now in her 50s, wobbled around with their 20 lb. watermelons. Some chimpanzees smashed the rinds, while others dribbled the giant fruits, like basketballs, the full length of the outdoor living area. It was a festive way to bring the chimpanzees into our celebration of the official merger between Friends of Animals and Primarily Primates. A truck brought the 80 watermelons plenty to go around for 65 chimpanzees. The hours-long watermelon party was, we can reveal, a smashing success. Baby Grace jumped up and down on one to crack it open. Wish all of our readers could have seen her little feet fly! The first six chimpanzees, the group living in one of the Air Force enclosures beside the pond, rushed from their bedrooms to see seven watermelons displayed high on their resting platforms, perched on climbing structures, or nestled in the grass. How wonderful! Ten year-old Thomas never disappoints. Thomas took ample opportunities to fling pieces of watermelon at the staff, then devoured most of a watermelon before afternoon. < /br> Scouts Help Primarily Primates

Girl Scouts Kristina Kirk (left), and Cassie Carpin, show off a new perch walk.

Girl Scouts Kristina Kirk (left), and Cassie Carpin, show off a new perch walk.

The local Scout troops have been a wonderful help to Primarily Primates. First, the Girl Scouts worked two days to renovate our Psittacine (parrot) Aviary. They planted trees and other greenery, built perching platforms, helped install electric wire to protect from the birds from predators, spread mulch, and constructed rock borders and a rock sidewalk. The Eagle Scouts were every bit as energetic, working several days installing new climbing structures and hammocks for the chimpanzees. Jobs well done! Primarily Primates Welcomes Sally, a Capuchin Sally, a white-throated capuchin monkey, arrived in April. Like many primates who arrive at Primarily Primates, the nine-year-old had been kept in a human home for her entire life. Her owners had become concerned when she started pulling her hair out and showing aggression. Her owner realized that Sally needed a better life and contacted us.

Sally curiously looks at the camera.

Sally curiously looks at the camera.

After bringing Sally to Primarily Primates, the owners stayed a couple days, to help Sally adjust. They did some welding and gardening too, and donated 750 pounds of peanuts. Two months later, Sally is adjusting well. She was paired with another capuchin, a vasectomized male named Sydney, and the two of them enjoy each other’s company. Sally curiously looks at the camera. Please let people you know hear about the consequences of keeping monkeys as pets. As adults, they become aware that they don’t fit in with a human family. Much as we love Sally and Sydney, we know the best situation for them would be to have been born and raised by capuchin families and sleeping in the rainforests. Welcoming Karibu, an Olive Baboon By mid-June, Primarily Primates anticipates the arrival of Karibu, formerly a subject of research at a university on the east coast. He will have a large outdoor living area alongside another baboon. Karibu means welcome in the African language of Swahili, and we will ensure our newest resident feels very welcome at Primarily Primates. Many Ways You Can Help Primarily Primates and Invest In the Future for Rescued Animals

Oliver takes one last bite.

Oliver takes one last bite.

Dear Primarily Primates Donor, There are so many good ways to support our caregiving work. Combined with gifts from other members, your donation makes a huge difference in what we can do. When you invest in Primarily Primates you become a vital part of our team of lifesavers who care about what happens to animals. All of our sanctuary’s residents will need care for the rest of their lives, and for some, that can mean 60 years or more. We’re using your gift to provide daily care, to renovate existing habitats, to build new living spaces, and to meet the animals’ mental and emotional needs – as we had so much fun doing at the watermelon party Priscilla threw for the apes recently! We also advocate on their behalf — to prevent animals from being bought and sold and put into positions of need in the first place. The summer has always been a time when donations drop. But the need to provide care for our animals continues all 12 months of the year. With three gibbon apes just returned home, I’d love to hear from you today. Please be as generous as you can. Become a Sanctuary Partner

Two chimpanzees investigate their new hammock and climbing structure

Two chimpanzees investigate their new hammock and climbing structure

Monthly donations in any amount provide a dependable source of support for our animals and make it convenient for you to give. Every day Primarily Primates feeds nearly 400 animals. Fresh fruit, produce, healthful treats, and nutritional supplements are included in their diet. Also provided continually is a large animal care staff that includes an on-site veterinarian! Consider becoming one of our very special Sanctuary Partners. By pledging a monthly gift, you’ll provide constant care for the individuals in one of our animal communities, from chimpanzees to birds! As a Sanctuary Partner, you’ll receive a videodisk of the animal community you’ve chosen to support. See the inside flap of the enclosed donation envelope for details.

Eagle Scouts assemble hammocks for chimpanzees at the sanctuary

Eagle Scouts assemble hammocks for chimpanzees at the sanctuary.

Sponsor Project Cargo Net or Project Hammock

See Video

Primarily Primates staff and volunteers have completed nearly 25 hammocks and climbing structures. That puts these projects just a little short of half way to completion. Cargo nets inspire hours of fun and climbing exercise for all of our primates. Used cargo nets are often found at shipping piers and trucking docks, and we’ll recycle them proudly. Shipping costs for donated nets run around $50. The frame and construction for hammocks runs about $200 each. Using donated used fire hoses, when interwoven and secured around a rectangular steel frame, they’re transformed into nest-like hammocks. Fire hose is durable and apes love to relax on their hammocks during the day. We’d love it if you’d sponsor a cargo net or hammock – and so would the nonhuman primates! Enclose a note inside your donation envelope to let us know your gift is for one of these projects. Fruits and Vegetables Bring Lots of Smiles

The animals love our produce sponsors.

The animals love our produce sponsors.

The price of food is rising everywhere because of higher transportation costs. Abundant fresh fruit and produce is not only necessary for the good health of primates, birds, and many other animals, they also welcome these treats with great anticipation and pleasure. We now spend over $700 each week for these food items. If you can sponsor any part of this cost, the animals will love you for it. Just include a note with your donation that it is for fruit and produce. Online Donations Make it Easy to Give For your convenience, you can always make a secure online gift to Primarily Primates by going to our site, www.primarilyprimates.org. And while you’re there, take a look at over 40 of the wonderful videos of the animals in whose future you’re investing. Thank you so much for helping and for being part of our sanctuary team. 

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