In Our View

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vote for the planet and all its inhabitants during elections
By Priscilla Feral

We are living at a crucial time in human history, FoA President Priscilla Feral notes in her latest In My View column. The decisions we make right now regarding our treatment of the planet and all its human and non-human inhabitants will affect future generations, for better or worse. We must resist the urge to be complacent on climate issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nonhuman animals can do the math too

Nonhuman animals’ counting capabilities allow them to navigate, protect themselves, forage, and find mates. The Wildlife Law Program examines the issue here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the Trail: Most Americans prefer wildlife watching so why is DOI expanding hunting?
By Fran Silverman

In every state in the U.S., wildlife watchers – that is, those who like to observe, photograph and appreciate animals in their habitats- far, far outnumber those who hunt for sport.  The majority of Americans, in short, do not hunt. Yet, the Department of Interior’s U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is continuing to prop up this dying industry in every which way, including a rule change allowing hunting in refuges that would be, in its own words, the “the single largest expansion of hunting and fishing opportunities by [FWS] in history.” FWS is purposefully out of touch with the desires of most taxpayers, FoA Communications Director Fran Silverman notes in her blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Be Less Trashy

By Dustin Rhodes

Did you know that less than 10 percent of the plastic you put in your recycling bin gets recycled, with the rest ending up in landfills and the ocean, endangering countless wildlife and marine mammals? But there are easy ways to be a less throw-away consumer. Here’s 20 tips from FoA Vice President of Development Dustin Rhodes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canada geese are misunderstood

By Nicole Rivard

Did you know that Canada Geese are compassionate. They take special care of the elderly and sick. During migration, if one goose is too weak to carry on with the rest of the flock, another healthy bird will stay behind with the weak bird, keeping he or she company and helping to protect them from predators until they regain strength or die. So how anyone can see them as pests is beyond me, writes FoA Editor Nicole Rivard in her most recent blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you fit a dog into your schedule?
By Meg McIntire

Working at an animal rights organization means I typically field a lot of questions about wildlife, pets, and veganism from my friends and family. But this recent text from a friend of mine really stuck with me and prompted me to question how people define being a responsible pet owner. Read more