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Spring 2017 - Act•ionLine

Letters

HUMAN BEINGS ARE THE MOST INVASIVE SPECIES

You’re right—inflicting pain in order to limit the spread of other invasive species is indefensible unless we reverse the expansion of the most invasive species of all, human beings. Not only does human overpopulation contribute to animal abuse but to most of the environmental and social calamities now overtaking us. Is there hope? The evidence is not encouraging, but the only honorable thing to do, if we love this beautiful world that has been entrusted to us, is to keep trying to educate people and thereby to change the situation. Thank you for setting an example of courage.

KERSTIN AND ROBERT ADAMS • VIA EMAIL

 

HUMAN OVERPOPULATION ARTICLE IS SPOT ON

Your current magazine article on human overpopulation is brilliant. Homo sapiens are the first to destroy other species, their own and their environment by not controlling reproduction. It is why we are losing the battle to preserve and protect wildlife and why the horrific factory farms are booming. China is the first known country to reduce its population (from 2 billion to 1.2 billion) by its 1-child incentives (now 2-child) and received criticism for this. With some religions against birth control and our federal plans to defund Planned Parenthood, we are moving toward extinction. In many societies, women are subject to forced sex, producing untold unwanted babies.

 

An organization I belong to (Universal Spirit) believes that the basis for human suffering is our brutal treatment of animals, including each other. In the first book of the Bible, God tells Adam and Eve, "You shall eat the fruit of the vine, and it shall be as meat to you ... and so it shall be with all other living creatures ... " It is a clear command to be vegetarian. I welcome the suffering to end through our self-extermination--the only way I see for renewal to occur.

 

Meanwhile, education, saving and helping every creature we can, and going vegan continue to alleviate the abominable torture. Friends of Animals is a leader in this effort. I don't know how Priscilla Feral and the FoA staff can bear the horror stories that come to their attention every day. You are angels of mercy in a world of atrocities. CLAIRE CONNELLY • ANGELS DEPOT

 

RESOURCE CENTER INC. HUMAN OVERPOPULATION A VITAL ISSUE

Your article on human overpopulation was overdue. When I'm asked if I have children, I reply eight—dogs, cats and rabbits. My husband and I decided all our children would be adopted, and everyone, including us, would be spayed or neutered (so to speak) Thank you for your forward-thinking philosophy and exploring an issue vital to animal rights, human rights, and the well-being of our planet. An additional donation will be forthcoming. SUE HOUSE • VIA EMAIL

 

ATTENTION TO HUMAN OVERPOPULATION LONG OVERDUE Thanks to the editor for having the bravery to print the article, “Humans Are the Most Overpopulated Species,” in Winter Action Line, 2016-17. It’s good to see someone put the correct label on the poison. I’ve heard plenty of “climate change” people tell us we must trade our SUV’s in for bicycles, shut off the lights and air conditioners, and go back to the lifestyles of the 1800s. But these same people are so afraid of the radical, religious extremists to even mention the root cause of climate change, which is the “runaway human population worldwide.” Birth control, contraception and Planned Parenthood are the best things that ever came to the human species. HERMAN LENZ • SUMMER, IA

 

THANK YOU FOR EXCELLENT STORY Nicole Rivard writes excellent material. All of her writings are good, especially the one titled, "Humans Are the Most Overpopulated Animals on the Planet Period." (Winter 2016-17, Action Line). Thank you Nicole. LOUIE GENZANO • VIA EMAIL

 

MISLEADING ADS CONCEAL ANIMAL CRUELTY I remember reading the story of the 18 elephants who were robbed of their natural lives some months ago and could not believe how “John Q. Public” remains consistently deaf and blind to the lies told by zoos and theme parks with regard to what they are really all about: the money. The photo in Action Line of one of the Swaziland elephants really bothered me.

 

To see a young, wonderfully sentient and intelligent being already exhibiting manic behaviors because of its captivity and lack of family is nothing short of heartbreaking. What is in store for this young life? Another 50 years of torture at the Sedgwick Zoo? How can the people responsible for the welfare of animals not see what is really happening and stop it from happening?

 

Before the summer began, I was floored by the television commercials SeaWorld produced and aired. Can those lies really be told? That SeaWorld takes the best care of its animals? Sure, by keeping them in pools that can never begin to mimic the residents’ natural home or forcing animals to perform tricks for human audiences. Is that how they are cared for? What of those commercials about the wonderful California dairy farms (family businesses, of course) where a calf is gently lifted by the farmer, so the baby could be bottle fed? Are these folks kidding? The only time they lift a new calf is to hurl it into the back of a pickup truck, to be sold to slaughter without ever once having the benefit of its mother’s milk.

 

Frankly it begs a question: Why would a calf need to be bottle fed, isn’t his mom right there? It’s just a bunch of baloney. These commercials don’t make any sense and yet the lies can be perpetuated as long as they are paid for, I suppose. The shame of it is that people believe the lies. By the way, love what you wrote about pigeons.

 

I am often amazed by how smart these birds are—they know my car! When I leave work, I often have seeds and nuts for them and as I come up the street in my car, they are flying above and next to me as I am driving until I throw the food out the window for them. Living in Brooklyn, there is limited “wild” to observe and enjoy, and as for me, pigeons and other winged beings are a treat to have around, though I know my opinion is definitely in the minority. ILENE LURIE • ASTORIA, OR

 

WINSOR SCHOOL ANIMAL CRUELTY ART PROJECT My name is Karina Peak and I go to the Winsor School in Boston, Massachusetts. I'm in seventh grade and I'm 12 years old. Throughout the past week, my school has been doing a Global Forum with several different studios and classes all surrounding the topic of trash. In my group we focused on making art that represents a global issue of our choice. The issue my partner Caroline and I focused on was animal rights and equality. Since I adore animals, I have always strongly opposed all forms of animal cruelty. Part of our task was to e-mail an organization that we support and share our project with them. I chose you!! We used trash and recycled materials to create a scale, and on top created a hand and a paw. We placed them on equal tiers of the scale to reflect animal equality. Here are some images of the project. KARINA PEAK • VIA EMAIL

 

Act•ionLine Spring 2017

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